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The PORTRAY System brings 3-D tomo to intraoral imaging

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The PORTRAY System has been designed to fit into a space similar to that of a conventional 2-D intraoral imaging device. (Photo: Surround Medical Systems)

Mon. 25 April 2022

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Intraoral tomosynthesis is now available to dentists nationwide. The PORTRAY System is the first stationary intraoral tomosynthesis X-ray imaging device to receive 510K premarket clearance from the FDA and is the result of two decades of discovery, innovation and development.

With the power of 3-D tomo, dentists can obtain more clinical information, resulting in more actionable diagnoses. The power of intraoral tomosynthesis imaging has been optimized to give the dentist more information about teeth, root conditions and bony structures.

The PORTRAY System has been designed to fit into a space similar to that of a conventional 2-D intraoral imaging device. It deploys a faster sensor that acquires images from an array of focal spots. The PORTRAY System uses a complex algorithm to create a volume of images that can be scrolled through in 0.5 mm “slices,” revealing internal tooth conditions such as fractures and caries. With the power of 2-D synthetic imaging, the image can also be rotated to open interproximal contacts.

The dentist will not have difficulty reading the 3-D tomo X-rays: If you can read a 2-D X-ray, you can read a PORTRAY System X-ray.

Workflows for technical staff are similar to conventional 2-D intraoral imaging. Tomosynthesis has been long used in other fields, such as mammography, with greater clinical effect than that of 2-D.

3-D tomo should not be confused with CBCT, as it deploys an entirely different imaging method and generates intraoral images with greater resolution.

The PORTRAY System is offered by Surround Medical Systems.

Dr. Enrique Platin, retired professor at The Adams School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in a statement: “In 70 years, this is the first viable X-ray device that changes how clinicians see dental structures on intraoral images.”

(Source: Surround Medical Systems)

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