Dental Tribune USA

Fluoride treatment of synthetic bio-material assists bone regeneration

By Dental Tribune America
June 05, 2013

NEW YORK, N.Y., USA: Guided bone regeneration is a common treatment before a dental implant procedure, and bio-materials treated with fluoride are displaying cell proliferation that can improve this process. The Journal of Oral Implantology has reported on a study of bio-resorbable synthetic hydroxyapatite granules used as a bone supplement material.

When these granules were exposed to a 4 percent sodium fluoride solution, cell proliferation was increased.

Bone regeneration techniques include the use of artificial materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate. Implant products are being made with surface coatings or textures that have a biological effect on protein attachment and cell proliferation. When fluoride is added to this surface, it activates osteoblastic, or bone-making, cells and increases the rate of bone regeneration.

In this study, hydroxyapatite granules were treated with a neutral 4 percent sodium fluoride solution. This led to the formation of a reactant resembling calcium fluoride on the surface of the granules. Immediate but slow release of fluoride came from the granules, and the concentration increased over time. Migration of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells was confirmed when compared to a nonfluoridated control sample.

Fluoride concentrations of 1.0- 2.0 parts per million (ppm) showed this positive effect. When the concentration reached 5.0 ppm, however, the opposite effect was observed—the fluoride significantly inhibited cell proliferation.

The authors concluded that the fluoride solution stimulates bone regeneration. The slow release of fluoride from hydroxyapatite granules facilitates osteogenesis, making this a beneficial method to supply fluoride and promote cell proliferation.

(Source: Journal of Oral Implantology)

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